Category Archives: mungbeans

Phytoplasma puffy pod and TSV are still present in CQ mungbean

In Central Queensland, both phytoplasma and tobacco streak virus are still a common occurrence this year in mungbean crops. Phytoplasma Transmitted by leaf hoppers, the specialised bacteria of phytoplasma can cause severe disease and reduce yield and/ or affected pods in mungbean and other grain legumes like soybean, peanuts, pigeon pea and chickpea. Phytoplasma infection in mungbean and other grain… Read more »

Mungbean disease alert

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After the wet weather in recent weeks there have been several reports of powdery mildew in mungbeans across Queensland and northern New South Wales, and Fusarium wilt has been found in several southern Queensland crops. Monitor crops closely for disease symptoms, and contact our plant pathologist, Lisa Kelly at [email protected] or 0477 747 040 for further information on disease diagnosis…. Read more »

Is your mungbean seed free of halo blight?

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Halo blight, caused by a bacterial pathogen (Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. phaseolicola) is one of the major diseases of beans world-wide, particularly in temperate regions. In mungbean, symptoms on leaves start as small, water-soaked lesions that are surrounded by a yellow-green halo (Figs 1 and 2). Symptoms may be visible at the 1st or 2nd trifoliate leaf stage and are often… Read more »

Tobacco streak virus strikes again in mungbean crops in Central Queensland: how to avoid future risks

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Key points: There was a resurgence in tobacco streak virus (TSV) disease in mungbeans in early 2020 TSV is restricted to central QLD and closely related to the distribution of parthenium weed Growers are encouraged to avoid areas of dense parthenium to reduce risk In autumn of 2020, tobacco streak virus (TSV) was found to be common in all mungbean… Read more »

Have you seen this mungbean disease recently?

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Several growers and agronomists across southern Queensland have reported extensive damage to their mungbean crops due to Fusarium wilt this season. Large areas of affected paddocks have plants that are wilted or dead, resulting in significant yield losses. The results of DAF annual disease surveys over the last five years have found that the disease is most common in crops… Read more »

Are leafhoppers and seedling thrips a threat to summer mungbeans?

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Leafhoppers (also known as jassids) and seedling thrips are extremely abundant in Central Queensland this summer. The vegetable leafhoppers (Austroascra viridigrisea) are very much an ‘in your eye’ pest, with swarms of the small (3mm) bright green critters flying up when disturbed in-crop. In contrast, the cotton seedling or cereal thrips (Thrips tabaci) are hiding out of sight, down in… Read more »

A tale of two moths and their larvae: beet webworm and bean podborer in CQ mungbeans

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Observations from recent Pulse Check field days in CQ Bean podborer (Maruca vitrata) and beet webworm (Spoladea recurvalis) are on the move in Central Queensland (CQ) mungbean crops. While both species may also be active in other mungbean regions, bean podborer is most likely to occur in coastal (e.g. the Burdekin) and subcoastal (Biloela, Kingaroy) regions. Bean podborer is a… Read more »

Phytoplasma in mungbeans—Update: early March 2018

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Phytoplama has been reported in second flower flushes in mungbeans, and also in harvested mungbean regrowth! So far the overall incidence of phytoplasma has been lower than this time last year, but growers and consultants are urged to keep monitoring their crops for the first symptoms of this disease, and to report any outbreaks. Many January-planted mungbean crops are at… Read more »

Keep a lookout for phytoplasma in mungbeans and other summer legumes

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Last summer saw unprecedented levels of phytoplasma in summer pulses/legumes (including chickpeas, mungbeans and pigeon peas) in all cropping regions in eastern and northern Australia from the Ord Irrigation area (WA), Burdekin/Atherton Tablelands (NQ), to central NSW. The most likely insect vector is the brown leafhopper Orosius orientalis, which has been detected in recent (2017) spring crops. While plantings of… Read more »

Rutherglen bug damage in mungbeans

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Although typically only in low numbers in the Northern Grains region, Rutherglen bugs (RGB; Nysius vinitor) were observed at very high densities (e.g. 50 RGB per pod) in many crops last year. A glasshouse study was conducted to determine at what plant stage mungbeans were most susceptible to RGB damage, in terms of both yield and seed quality. To do… Read more »